Low Bow/Dinged Up – 1st February 2015

Cat #: 170TZM

Bow low, my friends! The FAST SON’s coming and you don’t wanna lock eyes when he rises. Yes, it’s LOWBOW, and ooohhhhhh… “All of your future, stuck in your past / you still can’t work out why you’ll never last.” Baby. Sounds like these two rippers were cut fast & loose in ‘72, but no sirree, they got laid down last year right here in the P.R. of C, where time has ceased to be. LOOKOUT! You know the Fast Son moves quicker than the mutants on the bottom of the East China Sea, and “you can’t win with a draw.” LOWBOW, you see, rode from Dublin to D-22 on the wings of a faded dream and rebooted himself in the image of Bo Diddley’s ghost, putting his own grease on them post-proto-punk, gutter-oil-blues stompers we’ve come to need, all gold lamé and lightning speed. LOWBOW’s seen less than the Loch Ness ‘round these parts these days, but you know he’ll be back: that Fast Son won’t stay off the wagon for long. 

DINGED UP, on the other side, is just that. Their nearest metropole is Baltimore, for Poe’s sake! Their two tunes on this end of the slab won’t get you too down, but rest assured they are both “Made of Grief.” Recommended for fans of: six-note solos, suburban burnout blues, Saccharine Trust – Paganicons, 21st century garages (they no longer hold cars, just withering ennui and empty space, amps, drums). DINGED UP’s about to rain down on a city near you, USA ladies and dudes. They fly on the late summer winds like a trio of tumbleweeds. Dust off and suit up, Big Red, these two are for you.

LOW BOW 

All tracks conceived, written & performed by LOW BOW 
LOW BOW are Richard Doran (Electric Git & Vox) Michael Cupoli (Drum & Drum) 

Audio recording and final mastering by Mr. Yang Hai Song. Summer, 2013 in the People’s Republic Of China. 

LOW BOW hope that you find this recording to be of a professional standard. Served best via headphones or on A.M. radio. 

Thank you for purchasing this recording legally. Now, why not tell a friend that further LOW BOW recordings of HI fidelity standards can be found at  lowbow.bandcamp.com

For information or parenting tips,  lowbowband@gmail.com

DINGED UP 

All tracks written & performed by 
Joe Rankin 

Engineered by Jason Nicholls 
Produced & mixed by Joe Rankin & Jason Nicholls 
All recording, engineering & mixing took place Fall 2013 at Mutant Sun Studio in the U.S.A. 
Mastered by Chris Bentley in Fall 2013 at The Bunker studio, also in the U.S.A.  

dingedup.bandcamp.com
josephmrankin@gmail.com

Beijing photo by Richard Doran 
Western Maryland photo by Brad Reiter 
Additional artwork by Jason Nicholls 
Graphic Design by Jesse Davis 

GR029  
genjingrecords.com

Imported under license for Australia.

Snapline – Phenomena – 2nd August 2012

Cat #: 112TZM

By the time of release in the US, Snapline’s ‘Future Eyes’ (produced by Martin Atkins (PiL/Pigface)) didn’t meet the constantly evolving vision of the band.
With the support of Beijing label Maybe Mars, the band re-recorded many of the tracks and added others to complete something that more clearly expressed their artistic direction.
For Snapline ‘Phenomena’is a recording of clarity, keeping all the sounds pure – presence, tone, rhythm and frequency are all united. Vibration, sound, recording, phenomena – Snapline softly mix all these things together.

Various Artists – Generation Six – 25th October 2011

Cat #: 075TZM

2008 and 2009 has seen the formation of an impressive group of young bands in Beijing that are different from their predecessors and prove that the now-legendary generation of bands that started in 2004 and 2005 are by no means the final phase of the explosive creativity of Beijing music. Grouping themselves under the name of Generation 6 as a way of asserting their differences, these young bands perform with a level of confidence and sophistication that comes much more naturally to them than to the bands that preceded them. 

For much of the decade, pioneering musicians in Beijing had struggled to develop a scene with very little history to guide them. Most of them looked to foreign bands for their models because there was no home-grown talent that could offered them inspiration on how to be a Chinese rock and roll band. 

But the Generation 6 bands grew up in a completely different environment. For them China, and especially Beijing, offered one of the most exciting music scenes in the world, with a wide variety of innovative and successful bands and musicians that had received attention not only in China but throughout the world. 

There are at least fifteen or twenty very good Beijing bands that consider themselves part of Generation 6. Many of them see their home base as D-22, which has in the past year turned away from the music that made the club famous in 2007 and 2008 to dedicate itself primarily to this new generation of bands. Maybe Mars has selected four of the most representative bands to introduce the Generation 6 bands to a wider audience. This will be great chance to see early on the bands that will dominate interest over the next three to four years. 

Four selected bands in album: 

In just two years Rustic has become one of the most talked-about bands in Beijing because of their outrageous performances and hard-charging glam rock style. In early 2010 they went to London to represent Asia in the Global Battle of the Bands and unanimously took first place – the first time every judge had agreed on the winner. They consider Joyside to have been their key inspiration although they regularly show up at the gigs of Demerit and all their favourite Beijing punk bands. 

When Birdstriking’s drummer, who grew up in Jinzhou, had to choose which university he would attend, there was no doubt in his mind that it had to be in Beijing because he wanted to be able to catch every performance of his favorite band, Carsick Cars. Heavily influenced by their sonic exploration, as well as by the intensity of P.K.14, Birdstriking’s urgent music have made them one of the key bands of the young experimental musicians who congregate around Zhu Wenbo’s Zoomin’Nights. 

Flyx is a young punk band who combine a driving energy with an ability to craft beautiful songs, almost pop songs, much like their heroes, punk gods Demerit. 

The band Old Fashion’s name is from lines “I am not old fashion” of Audrey Hepburn in George Cukor’s old movie My Fair Lady. They keep “old” traditional rock & roll way, as well as keep “anti-old” musical creative idea. After four years’ growth, Old Fashion has found their way from garage-revival to disco punk and become a popular band among the youth. 

Various Artists – Zoomin’ Night Vol 1 – 14th October 2011

Cat #: 073TZM

They love giving impromptu shows on Tuesday nights. 
They love playing in unconventional configurations. 
They love making sounds out of anything they can carry on to the stage. 
They love unpredictable musical performances. 
They love making one song constantly became another. 
They love the Zoomin’ Night. 

Zoomin’ Night – the name of a song by P.K. 14 – is also a series of shows of experimental music / noise rock held every Tuesday at D-22 in Beijing. It was inspired by other experimental music series such as the Waterland Kwanyin, Sugarjar Sunday Listen- ing and Sheng Dong Ji Xi. Reflecting the type of music they create, most of the Zoomin’ Night participants are creative and young musicians. They arrange sounds, start new bands and re- group constantly. They have found a home at D-22 and profess to draw their inspiration from Beijing’s energetic cacophony. 

In January 2010, Yang Haisong came to D-22 to record all their live shows that month. Most of the bands recorded were newly formed in 2009. Maybe Mars selected 9 songs from the recordings, putting them into a compilation. Additionally, buyers can download 32 additional tracks with a download-code enclosed in each CD. 

On November 19-20, 2010 the premiere of this compilation album was held at D-22. There were 8 groups of performers including: noise rock, psychedelic rock, post-punk, minimalism, improvisation, and synthesizer mu- sic. Most of the performers are included in this album. 

The Zoomin’ Night on November 23rd was the official “after party” for the premiere: five young musicians who took part in the album gave a personal solo performance, ranging from classical music to atmospheric experimental, and from minimal electronic music to industrial jazz. 

Carsick Cars – You Can Listen, You Can Talk – 1st October 2011

Cat #: 030TZM

The second studio album from Carsick Cars is the long-awaited “You Can Listen, You Can Talk” from Carsick Cars,” following by nearly two years the explosive and almost joyful anger of their first CD, “Panda Noise”. 

Produced by P.K.14 frontman Yang Haisong, their first CD threw out into the Chinese indie scene some of its most iconic songs, including “Zhongnanhai”, widely seen as the anthem of disenfranchised Chinese youth, and “Rock and Roll Hero”, a standard for younger bands. 

Their new record was produced by legendary producer Wharton Tiers after New York composer John Myers caught a Carsick Cars show during his visit to Shanghai and was so struck by the band that he immediately began lobbying for Tiers to produce them. As might be expected, the second CD is much bleaker and more complex than the first, with delicate, shimmering songs side by side with powerful, rage-filled eruptions of noise and chaos. 

But for all their differences both CDs are marked by the almost magical song-writing skill of frontman Shouwang, whose facility for combining complex harmonic structures with beautiful melodies and straight ahead guitar riffs make him one of he best songwriters in the world.